The 11 Question Artist Interview Series

 

Seren Moran

"As time goes on I find that my art really is just an extension of myself, so it’s hard to separate between what is me and what is my art. What I learn in life is reflected in my work and what I learn in my work is reflected in my life. They are really just one in the same." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

Leslie Supnet

"Most if not all my work draws on personal experience. Though personal, I focus on experiences most of us go through – loss, grief, longing, loneliness, awkwardness and love." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

Clint Enns

"...I love making films and videos, however, the most satisfying part is when a work breaks your expectations and you produce something better than you imagined it would be." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

Beti Bricelj

"My art possesses limitless possibilities for interpretation. My purpose is to stir emotions within the observer who has to be open-minded and, above all, not burdened with explanations." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adriana Mosquera

"My interest is not to impose a meaning, because there is no one single way of seeing and experiencing the world. For me it is vital that everything which comes from there, from that first meeting, is there where the work finally is completed, when the spectator gains a proper sense from its context, from their experience." read more >>>

 

 

 

Mike Frick

"I’m not trying to teach anyone anything. If a portrait connects with someone emotionally that’s great, what else could I hope for as a painter?" read more >>>

 

 

 

 

 

Inga Pae

"Simplicity of a photograph has always compelled me to keep looking. An image can be clear the same way that language is. A word is precise, but its meaning can change based on the words around it. When a person looks at an image, they will always think of themselves, their own life experience. And even that perspective can change daily." read more >>>

 

 

 

Dan McHale

"I would like a person to experience some soulfulness when they take in my work. I want them to go to a dark place, and come back again. So what they might take away is a shudder of dread at where they’ve been. And having survived, they’re glad to be alive." read more >>>

 

 

 

Benjamin Meyer

"For me, painting is the act of reconsidering. I get to create problems and then try to solve them. I’m always looking for ways to question what I thought I knew, and I get to operate on my own terms." read more >>>

 

 

 

Lillian Bayley Hoover

"My art was the only platform I had, so it seemed natural to explore those issues, ask tough questions, and challenge a pervasive numb indifference." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

 

Scott F. Hall

"In sum, we live in an age in which an artist or craftsman experiences more freedom than ever to make, to show, and to interact with others and shine brightly within the niche area of her greatest interest. It’s an excellent time to be alive and to be making and showing work." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

danconnortown

"In that moment when the mirror flips up and the shutter is opening and closing, I am 100% in it. Me the camera, the subject, the light, everything – and it feels like new age hippy to say so, but that moment is truly why I take pictures at all." read more >>>

 

 

 


Maria Zaikina

"I believe art should be beautiful, sublime and take you to a new level: make you better, no matter if you are looking at it or making it." read more >>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Ben Valentine

"I like when a stranger really understands and connects with my work, that is an exciting feeling. Yet really the best part of the creative process, for me, is walking through life with an artistic lens. I walk trying to keep really looking, and that is just a good way to be." read more >>>

 

 

 

Peter Tonningsen

"It was graduate school that really cemented my commitment to and passion for fine art photography and art in general. That experience made me believe that art can be an enriching raison d’être." read more >>>

 

 

 

Tallulah Terryll

"It’s easy to make a drawing or a painting that looks pretty. But to push it past that. For it to be ugly for a while. It needs that before it can really be interesting or beautiful. And embracing the unexpected." read more >>>

 

 

 

Rebecca Najdowski

"At the root of it all, I am trying to better understand my experience of the world. It is a way of creating and analyzing what is going on around and inside of me. It is a bit like a creation story that I am telling myself." read more >>>